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Letter from ALBERT G. PEIRCE to GEORGE PERKINS MARSH, dated March 12, 1864.

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Item Description

Title: Letter from ALBERT G. PEIRCE to GEORGE PERKINS MARSH, dated March 12, 1864.

Author

  • Peirce, Albert G.

Recipient

  • Marsh, George Perkins, 1801-1882

Source Document

Extent: 1 letter

Genre(s): letter

Subject/topic

Subject/name

Note [Digital Version]

, Center for Digital Initiatives, University of Vermont Libraries

Type of Resource: text

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Permanent Link:

http://cdi.uvm.edu/collections/item/agpgpm640312

Preferred citation

Letter from ALBERT G. PEIRCE to GEORGE PERKINS MARSH, dated March 12, 1864., Original located at the University of Vermont's Special Collections in the George Perkins Marsh Collection, filed by date., http://cdi.uvm.edu/collections/item/agpgpm640312 (accessed September 21, 2014)

Letter from ALBERT G. PEIRCE to GEORGE PERKINS MARSH, dated March 12, 1864.

Transcribed by :

TEI mark-up by : James P. Tranowski andEllen Thomson


Published by: University of Vermont. All rights reserved.

Publication Information

Burlington March 12th 1864



Geo P. Marsh Esqr

Dr Sir

Yours of Feb'y 23rd arrived last night. We are glad to know of your continued good health. In regard to the missing book I think for once in your life you must be mistaken for Mother says she "fixed up things" on your table after you left and is positive that there was no such book upon it. I dont know of a single book having been taken from the office except a few that George took and that was not among them

It is barely possible that Mr Torrey may have it but he is so unwell that I cannot see him and I fear he will never be any better. Miss Wheeler seems better and I see her out riding once in a while. Mr & Mrs James Hickok are still at St Paul and I -------------------------------- Page -------------------------------- hear Some talk of their remain[in]g there the coming Summer. Mrs Spooner died yesterday, dont recollect of any more of your acquaintances having died since I wrote before. Mrs Turk (Mrs M will know her) is quite low and fears are entertained as to her recovery. She has had a young child recently. The Hickoks are all about as usual I believe. Town matters are just now quiet but we had an unusually excited town meeting. Rum caused it I suppose, it is the cause of everything. The Maine law friends nominated for County Commissioner a man named Whitney of Williston. Afterward the liberals that is "rummies," nominated Ed Mason of Richmond and we elected him. Nobody need go dry now. There were 769 votes cast for commissioner in this town so you may judge how hot a time we had. The usual number is about 300 on such occasions.

Politics I am sorry to say begin to take -------------------------------- Page -------------------------------- too much of the attention of people now. I think if we dont let such matters alone as long as possible we shall have Jeff for our next occupant of the White House.

Chase has just written a letter to his friends and the public declining to be a candidate. Unless matters change very much during the coming six months I think Lincoln perfectly sure of a reelection and if so I suppose we shall not see you very soon again. I should think from your letter that you lived in Vermont. Two feet of snow sounds rather "Arctic" I think. Our mild weather continues and the Sugar Makers are very busy in the woods. I should like to send you a sample of the pure article. The broad lake is open but navigation is not yet resumed. There has been no crossing for teams this winter here and but a few days that foot passengers could cross. In regard to -------------------------------- Page -------------------------------- your book I would gladly accept your proposition about dividing the profit or loss if I thought it would be out in time to be of any benefit to me in this world. When this world gets to be what it was intended to be your books will sell. We have just had a lecture from Wendell Phillips of Boston. He of course went father than most of us. Pomeroy left the room he was so mad to think that he should dare find fault with the President. He said some good things among others "that Hunkers never change their opinions, they die, that is the way that God disposes of them." I think that true to the letter. Some of the capitalists of this town are moving to have a full supply of soft water so that all of us may keep clean. The proposition is to force water by means of a wheel from the upper dam at Winooski to the high ground in the rear of the Spooner place into a reservoir holding 3.000.000 gallons, and thence distribute it over the town. It gives 310 feet fall at the surface of the lake. cost $100.000 -------------------------------- Page -------------------------------- You may expect to be astonished soon in a way you never dreamed of. The programme of the democratic party in the coming election just begins to leake out. Their "platform" is to be, the immediate, entire and unconditional Aolition of Slavery. They see that with anything else they do not stand a ghost of a chance. Surely the Millennium is approaching when democrats preach Abolition. They always would steal and now they mean to "steal our thunder" I dont know how Hollenbeck and such old fossils as he will swallow the dose but they will of course if it is democratic. The name, democratic sugar coats any pill, however bitter, to such as he. What refuge there is for Rogers I am sure I dont know With steadfast faith he leans on the Herald and hopes for the success of the rebellion It is talked here that Mr Edmunds will -------------------------------- Page -------------------------------- be our next Congressman if Mr Baxter has provided for all his friends and relations Bishop Hopkins has not said a single word in regard to the "Divine institution" for some time. When Abolition becomes a dogma of the democratic party he will be left out in the cold. I rather think he will tag along after them and wont think the thing quite so Divine after all. Theodore takes the control of the Institute as he calls it.

A cent looks as large around to him as our park. Every body desires to be remembered to everybody,

Yours c

A G. Peirce

I have just returned from the Dentists where I left a tooth. I hope you may all be enjoying the same blessing I dont mean the pulling, but the satisfaction afterwards. With love to you all Your fri[e]nd

J S Peirce

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